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How does winter affect my succulents?

Winter is a very interesting time for succulents and their owners. Winter effects will vary from appearance change, to color change, to partial or total loss of leaves. It is important to remember that succulents, like us, love life and are willing to make necessary sacrifices to thrive.    

 Hardy Sedums:  

Sedums will vary from no significant change, to partial or total loss of leaves through Winter.  

During the Winter, some sedums may slightly change color.  It may change from a lush green or colorful sedum, to a dull color during its dormant cycle.  

Other sedum will take on a more dramatic change that may get you worried.  They will start to lose all its leaves on the stems and look like they are dying.  They are not though!  They are doing what it takes to survive winter.  If you dig through the dead foliage to the base of the soil you usually will find new growth.  The new growth is protecting itself during the Winter.  When Spring comes around, they will be lush and colorful again.  


Sempervivums:

Sempervivums, or hens and chicks, will respond to the cold by changing color and closing up the rosettes.  

The change in color, usually from green to a different color.  The color change happens because the pigment helps protect the Sempervivum from the cold.  It will also ball up the rosette into what looks like a tight little rock for additional protection.  Once Spring rolls around, they will lose it’s color and blossom beautiful sprawling rosettes.    


Echeveria, Crassula, Kalanchoe, and other soft succulents:

These are all considered soft succulents and will not have any drastic changes during winter time.  If you keep them outdoors in freezing temperature, they will die.  Soft succulents come from mostly sub-tropical regions of the world and will not thrive outdoors in most of the country during freezing temperatures.  Fortunately, these soft succulents make excellent indoor plants.  


If you are bringing succulents indoors this winter, here are some helpful tips for doing that!

 

What about you guys?  Any tips on certain plants doing odd things in the winter?  Anything we missed?  Comment below!  


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